Hannah Drake

What I Learned from Marie Kondo

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Yes, everybody and their mother is talking about Marie Kondo and her new Netflix series. I actually bought her second book back in August though, so I feel like I can say I’m not totally on the bandwagon. (Though I didn’t start it until this year when everyone was raving about her show.) Regardless, there’s a lot to learn from her and I am here for it. I feel like I’m on a decluttering, simplifying, organising hot streak and seriously have to stop myself from starting a new project when I get a second wind just before going to bed. (Why does that always happen?!)

I’m slowly but surely making my way through the house, trying to embrace her method of going by groups of items rather than room-by-room, but the goal remains the same: declutter, simplify, and organise every inch of our house, leaving behind only the things that spark joy.

IT’S MORE THAN JUST ORGANISATION

A friend shared this article from HuffPost on Facebook a few weeks ago that I found very interesting. From reading her book, I knew there was more than meets the eye with her technique. Her methods are deeply rooted in Japanese culture and the Shinto religion and it’s important to understand that before diving in. There’s a reason why she wants you to wake up your books by tapping on them or why she wants you to thank the things you don’t want to keep or why she greets the house before she even begins. Those things probably feel so foreign in western culture, but I’m so intrigued by this approach. It seems to foster a deeper connection to and gratitude for the things you do have, which is a far cry from the gross American materialisation that runs so rampant throughout the country and straight through my own life. I would rather have fewer things that I truly love—that spark joy—than a house cluttered with the latest trends and things I’ll never use or wear again.

THERE’S SO MUCH ROOM FOR ACTIVITIES

It probably goes without saying that if you’re going through your clothes and pulling things to donate or get rid of, you’re going to end up with more space. However, when you reorganise things in ways that make more sense or are more convenient for you and when you implement the Konmari folding method, there is just so much more space. Before I refolded my clothes using her techniques, I was cramming piles of tank tops into my under bed storage and shoving more and more socks into my sock drawer. It was a disaster. Clothes were getting caught in the back of the drawers and it seemed like there was no space for anything else. When I refolded my socks, there was space in the back of the drawer. When I refolded my shirts, I was able to put all of them into one drawer instead of spread out between two drawers. When I refolded my pants, I made use of the little bit of empty space that was unusable before. I ended up pulling a few things hanging in my wardrobe to donate and now it feels like I can see everything hanging in there. There’s room to push the clothes apart and slide the hangers on the rack instead of nothing being able to budge. It just feels great! The trick, however, is not seeing the empty space and feeling a need to fill it.

SOME THINGS SPARK JOY BECAUSE THEY SERVE A PURPOSE

In her book, she talks about getting rid of a screw driver because it didn’t spark joy for her. She was able to make do without one, but she realised after the fact that the screw driver did bring her joy because it served its purpose faithfully. This was so helpful to keep in mind when going through every category in our house. We all have clothes that aren’t for everyday wear, but useful to have when we have a special event that requires dressing up or wearing something specific. Other things around the house may serve a very specific purpose in your life or in your home and that might be enough to spark joy for you, even if you don’t feel warm and fuzzy about a screw driver.

SLOW AND STEADY WINS THE RACE

I was shocked by the number of days the families on the show took to complete everything in each episode. Sometime it was over a month! But then it occurred to me that I too was nearing a month and a half of organising (just not doing it so intensely as these families). It’s been helpful to take my time and really be in the right mindset to actually tidy up effectively.

But on that same note, it’s been a serious struggle for me to not just buy all the things. Not stuff to fill the space in our house where the things we’ve tossed and donated once were, but actually storage stuff. I’m dying to get new drawers for our bedroom. I would actually love to get drawers for either side of the bed to double as a bedside table, but that’s a story for another day. Having more drawers would definitely condense how our clothes are organised and also allow for more room. Right now, Luke’s trousers are too tall when folded in the Konmari Method for our drawers. My jumpers also won’t fit in our drawers, but fit nicely in the under bed storage we have. Anyway, I did buy a few storage baskets for the kitchen (to organise cleaning supplies, dish towels, glass bottles and jars, and vases), some vacuum storage bags, structured storage bags (for bedding and bags), and under bed storage (for out of season clothing). But other than that, I’m trying to make do with what we have. I know we’ll upgrade our drawers eventually after we move so it’s fine for now. And in the meantime, who cares if we’re using cardboard boxes to organise the drawers in our kitchen rather than getting cute storage boxes or bins?

Have you been watching Tidying Up or reading her book? Did you get hit with a bug to declutter and organise your whole house in the new year? (It’s okay if you didn’t!)

I just want to leave you with this tweet. Buzzfeed did like four articles featuring the best of Marie Kondo tweets, but this one is far and away the best.

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